Chinese New Year – 5th February

This festival is believed go as far back as prehistory. It marks the start of the new lunar cycle and is called the Spring Festival (in the northern hemisphere) as it falls between the December solstice and the March equinox. China follows the Gregorian calendar for daily business but the dates of the Chinese New Year and other important festivals are determined by the Chinese calendar.

Each year in the Chinese calendar is assigned to an animal. According to one belief, Buddha promised gifts to all animals that would pay him homage. Only 12 animals came to honor Buddha so, to favor these 12 animals, each one was given one of the 12 years of the Chinese zodiac. People are said to inherit distinctive characteristics from the animal of their birth year. The signs repeat every 12 years.

The Chinese calendar is based on astronomical observations of the Sun’s longitude and the Moon’s phases. It is believed to have been introduced by Emperor Huangdi (or Huang Ti) at some stage around 2600 to 3000 BCE. According to legend, the emperor invented the calendar in 2637 BCE. This calendar predates the Gregorian calendar, which was introduced in 1582. The Chinese lunar calendar is used to determine festivals. Since the length of the Chinese calendar year differs from the length of a year in the Gregorian calendar, the Gregorian dates of these festivals vary each year. Various Chinese communities around the world also use this calendar.

Chinese New Year is not a public holiday in the UK. Parades and large scale public celebrations may cause some local disruption to traffic, particularly in city centres and Chinatown areas. Some Chinese shops and other businesses may keep different hours during the Chinese New Year period.

 

The Pig is the twelfth of all zodiac animals. According to one myth, the Jade Emperor said the order would be decided by the order in which they arrived to his party. Pig was late because he overslept. Another story says that a wolf destroyed his house. He had to rebuild his home before he could set off. When he arrived, he was the last one and could only take twelfth place.

The Pig is also associated with the Earthly Branch, and the hours 9–11 in the night. In terms of yin and yang, the Pig is yin. In Chinese culture, pigs are the symbol of wealth.

Their chubby faces and big ears are signs of fortune as well.

Recent years of the Pig are: 1935, 1947, 1959, 1971, 1983, 1995, 2007, 2019

 

 

Personality and characteristics

Pigs might not stand out in a crowd. But they are very realistic. Others may be all talk and no action. Pigs are the opposite.

Though not wasteful spenders, they will let themselves enjoy life. They love entertainment and will occasionally treat themselves. They are a bit materialistic, but this is motivation for them to work hard. Being able to hold solid objects in their hands gives them security.

They are energetic and are always enthusiastic, even for boring jobs. If given the chance, they will take positions of power and status. They believe that only those people have the right to speak, and that’s what they want.

Lucky things for Pigs

  • Colours: yellow, grey, brown
  • Numbers: 2, 5, 8
  • Mineral: agate
  • Directions of auspiciousness: southeast, east
  • Directions of wealth: northeast
  • Directions of love: north

Unlucky things

  • Colours: blue, green
  • Numbers: 1, 7, 9

 

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